A Year in Chicken Soup - Cock-a-leekie


chicken soup right

A Year in Chicken Soup


Cock-a-leekie 2


COCK-A-LEEKIE

 

Join Hattie Garlick for the final instalment of A Year in Chicken Soup. After twelve months of culinary globetrotting via soups from Cambodia to Syria, Mexico to Nigeria, she returns to these shores for a final get-together with friends old and new round a soothing bowl of cock-a-leekie.

 

Spam

Spam

 

 

Title says it all... or does it? 

Which meaning of the word is the first one you think of?  Here's a short vox pop introduction to the subject. 

To be continued...

 

 Watch video

 

The Wasp - Order of the boot

comp_waspJust heard that a Danish restaurant has been voted the world's top eaterie. Amongst other offerings they serve carrots with the soil still on them so that "you can reconnect with the earth". I know exactly where my boot would reconnect given half the chance. What absurdly pretentious twaddle. Glad to hear that Heston B is still up there. He's a genuine English eccentric in love with the theatre of food and I doubt whether he could even spell the word pretension.


the wasp, 27 April 2010


Burger Culture

TimH

 

Meet TimH.  Film student, YouTube star, sometime editor for Talking Of Food... in his own words:

"I say stuff about things on the internet".

Currently in USA, Tim will be reporting on his food findings during his travels. This is his first take on Burger Culture. There will be more to come...

 

 

 

Brick Lane

Brick Lane 2

Brick Lane in London's East End has been the home to an ever-changing community over the last five or six decades.

Elliot Lang interviews his grandfather, a local resident who remembers the days when Brick Lane reflected its predominantly Jewish population. One product has remained constant throughout - the  bagel,  which has always been a feature of this vibrant market street.  Watch the film and enjoy.

Elisabeth Luard

 

Elisabeth Luard

Elisabeth Luard is a much acclaimed food writer with a long list of books, memoirs and journal articles, and a former Trustee Director of the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery. In 2016 she was given a Lifetime Achievement Award by the Guild of Food Writers.

Elisabeth visited Talking Of Food recently to record extracts from her latest book Squirrel Pie and Other Stories.  She also talked to Anne Dolamore, and their conversation ranged from her childhood abroad and her years spent in Andalusia with a young family, to her perception of the current state of cookery in the UK.

Watch the interview here

 

 

 

Julyan Wickham and Matthew Fort

Kensington PlaceKensington Place opened in 1987. The first of its kind, it was to be highly influential in the future of restaurant design in Britain.  It's glass facade brought the city into the restaurant;  it was uncompromisingly loud, buzzy and open to the world. 

The architect was Julyan Wickham who talks to Matthew Fort about the challenges of restaurant design.  The conversation ranges widely over issues of architecture and the restaurant scene.  Riveting stuff.

European Peasant Cookery

 

European Peasant Cookery

 

Elizabeth Luard reads an extract from the Introduction to her first book, European Peasant Cookery. First published in 1984, it was republished in the UK in 2007 by Grub Street.

This passage is an evocative description of her first encounters with food in remote Andalusia, Spain, having moved there with her husband and three young children in the 1960s.

 

Listen here 

 

 

 

   

Kafka's Soup

 

Kafkas Soup

 

Mark Crick’s  Kafka’s Soup: A Complete History of World Literature in 17 recipes is a book often borrowed and seldom returned.  It is a joy to dip into this collection of literary pastiches for recipes written in the style of Raymond Chandler, Irvine Welsh, Charles Dickens, John Steinbeck, Homer, Chaucer and so on.

Here the author has chosen to read for us Quick Miso Soup à la Franz Kafka and Tiramisu à la Marcel Proust.  A third recipe, Tarragon Eggs à la Jane Austen is read by Annie Sedgwick.

 

 

   

Kitchen Man 2

Paul Levy 4

 

In his second podcast, "Japan", Paul Levy talks about the history of Japanese food, quoting Bee Wilson in her new book, First Bite, to show that our belief that it must have a long history is completely misconceived.  He also asks the question what other nation has changed their food culture as radically as the Japanese.  His answer is perhaps surprising.